International Journal of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 3--11

One hundred years after Vitamin D discovery: Is there clinical evidence for supplementation doses?


Shahram Ghanaati1, Joseph Choukroun3, Ulrich Volz2, Rebekka Hueber2, Carlos Fernando de Almeida Barros Mourão4, Robert Sader1, Yoko Kawase-Koga3, Ramesh Mazhari4, Karin Amrein5, Patrick Meybohm6, Sarah Al-Maawi1 
1 Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt; FORM (Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Medicine)-Lab, Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
2 SDS Swiss Dental Solutions AG, Kreuzlingen, Switzerland
3 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
4 Division of Cardiology, George Washington University, Washington, D.C, USA
5 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
6 Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Shahram Ghanaati
Department of Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, Building 23 B, UG, 60590 Frankfurt/Main
Germany

In the last decade, an increasing awareness was directed to the role of Vitamin D in nonskeletal and preventive roles for chronic diseases in different fields. Vitamin D deficiency was reported in many countries worldwide and is considered as a pandemic. However, no consensus exists about whether and how supplementation of Vitamin D may be beneficial as a preventive or adjuvant therapy. Thereby, this review aimed to deliver an overview about the administrated doses of Vitamin D in randomized controlled clinical studies, in order to evaluate the currently available clinical evidence. In addition, focus was placed on the recent advances on Vitamin D nonskeletal actions. The results sometimes showed a great discrepancy between the recommended Vitamin D dose by different guideline authorities, which are from 400 to 4000 IU/day, and the used doses in recent randomized controlled clinical studies, which were up to 100,000 IU/day. Different studies showed the positive effect of Vitamin D in supporting the immune system and preventing different chronic and infectious diseases. These findings reflect the need to rethink existing reference ranges and intake recommendations. Based on the analyzed range of clinically applied doses, we recommend a Vitamin D supplementation based on three different ranges, which include <40 ng/ml, >40 <80 ng/ml, and >80 ng/ml with oral Vitamin D intake of 10,000 IU/day, 5000 IU/day, and 1000 IU/day, respectively. A 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood serum monitoring is furthermore recommenced every 3 months to re-adjust the Vitamin D dose based on the above-mentioned concept. Ongoing clinical studies will have to further prove this concept for different patient groups.


How to cite this article:
Ghanaati S, Choukroun J, Volz U, Hueber R, Mourão CF, Sader R, Kawase-Koga Y, Mazhari R, Amrein K, Meybohm P, Al-Maawi S. One hundred years after Vitamin D discovery: Is there clinical evidence for supplementation doses?.Int J Growth Factors Stem Cells Dent 2020;3:3-11


How to cite this URL:
Ghanaati S, Choukroun J, Volz U, Hueber R, Mourão CF, Sader R, Kawase-Koga Y, Mazhari R, Amrein K, Meybohm P, Al-Maawi S. One hundred years after Vitamin D discovery: Is there clinical evidence for supplementation doses?. Int J Growth Factors Stem Cells Dent [serial online] 2020 [cited 2022 Jan 17 ];3:3-11
Available from: https://www.cellsindentistry.org/article.asp?issn=2589-7330;year=2020;volume=3;issue=1;spage=3;epage=11;aulast=Ghanaati;type=0